Exploring the impact of broadband and technology on our lives, our businesses, and our communities.

Phone number registry completes the puzzle

Stealth Communications has announced the ENUM registry, which will allow VoIP providers to complete calls without going through the public switched telephone network (PSTN). When a VoIP called completed, it usually goes over the "old" telephone network at least part of the way. In turn, the VoIP provider has to pay an access fee to the network owner (e.g. Verizon, SBC, Qwest, etc).

The ENUM registery is a free service that links a VoIP telephone number with the IP address where the phone is plugged in, so the VoIP provider can simply look up the called number in the registry and send the voice packets straight to the IP address of the receiving phone.

This sounds simple, and it is. But it is critically important, because it provides a way to build a "pure" VoIP global voice system without ever using the old switched system. It's the last piece of the VoIP puzzle.

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Don't count out fiber

There is much interest in wireless systems right now, and rightly so. Wireless broadband is inexpensive and a great way to get people a broadband alternative quickly. But many of those wireless hotspots still need a wired connection to the Internet, and most homes and businesses will want both--it's not either/or. Fiber is going to be needed for high definition television, high quality videoconferencing, and network backups, among other bandwidth-intensive applications.

The good news about fiber is the falling prices. LENOWISCO Planning District, one of the nation's leaders in community fiber initiatives, was budgeting $30,000/mile a year ago for duct/fiber installations. Today, their cost is about $8500/mile, due in large part to the falling cost of fiber, which is now about the same price as copper. Fiber switches and Ethernet interfaces are also much less expensive than a year or two ago, so the overall cost of fiber to the home and fiber to the business systems is lower.

Communities that are rehabbing downtowns with new streets and sidewalks should be adding telecom duct and pullboxes to create high tech downtowns that will attract white collar businesses. It's inexpensive if you already have paving plans and/or are replacing the sidewalks. Those new streetlamps, benches, and brick sidewalks are not going to bring new businesses in....but low cost, high capacity broadband delivered by fiber will.

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Gigablast: Better than Google?

Just as Google is finally going to sell stock to the public, yet another search engine, called Gigablast, has appeared, with a name that is at least partly a sly pun (google is a '1' with a hundred zeroes after it; 'giga' is a billion).

Gigablast appears to have a different set of algorithms than Google, and a few queries I tried seemed to offer slightly better results, with fewer extraneous hits. As always, competition is a good thing, especially with Google's strategy of late of trying to tie their own content to search results--not a good thing from the user perspective.

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Updated news page

Welcome to the new and improved news page. I'm using some blogging software that will enable me to add stories and news more frequently and with less effort.

This news page is now syndicated, so if you are using an RSS news reader, you can now point it here as well. To get the URL of the news feed, just click on the orange XML button over on the right.

If you have any problems or encounter errors, please let me know (info@designnine.com).

Thanks,
Andrew

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